Saturday, October 29, 2011

Single Bloomers

There is a wheelbarrow situated on my north lawn brimming with a load of garden clippings, awaiting my removal. When it's emptied, I will have another, then another for that trusty one-wheeled workhorse.

Calliopsis volunteer ... a burritt plant, Linnie
While traipsing through the garden recently, I came upon this little sport growing straight up through a jungle of leaning raspberry canes. I was surprised and somewhat stupefied to see it because it was exactly 15 years ago, (yes I had to double-check by counting on my fingers) that its parents grew in this spot--the very first summer I gardened here. So, this little flower's seed lay dormant in this spot all these years! Either that or an airplane with a leaky cargo of Calliopsis seed flew over. 

Alstromeria
 One last stem of blooming Alstro, backlit by afternoon sunlight, also delighted me that day.

Spiraea 'Neon Flash' 
As did the single stem of bright pink Spirea. Have you noticed that it's to that point again? The season when all of the thrills of summer's plethora are condensed and funneled through the siting of a singular colorful stem?

30 comments:

Bernie said...

I would love to find out the story of that little Calliopsis volunteer! How amazing that it should pop up so long after its parents vacated the spot. Your Alstromeria is brilliant and the Spirea is so pretty. All these loners are just lovely.

Darla said...

Morning.. First, why is there a blurred triangle with an exclamation mark in the middle of it for your header photo? Ahh, wheelbarrows full of clippings and aging foliage. I wasn't shocked by the sighting of the Calliopsis because it took 15 years to incubate, but because it's not a "pink" color I recognize. :) Beautiful color on the Alstromeria, mostly what I see have more of a rust color. Love the neon flash. I have a small piece of spiraea that I have been babying all summer from Ms. Doris. Haven't a clue it's color, I just know it's not supposed to be white....It's 44 here right now...

Muddy Boot Dreams said...

It's the time of year when every single bloom no matter how ragged feels like opening presents on Christmas morning. Maybe we learn to appreciate it more this time of year.

A lovely collection.

Jen @ Muddy Boot Dreams

Laura said...

That story of the yellow flower coming after 15 years is AMAZING!

Donna said...

That's exactly how my garden is...I search frantically for one bloom to covet and gaze upon for hours before the next freeze claims it...

Corner Gardener Sue said...

I don't think we've reached that point here yet. That's amazing how your calliopsis came up after 15 years. I have some queen Anne's lace coming up after I thought I had gotten all of it pulled. I imagine there are more seeds waiting to sprout yet, too.

I have been using 5 gallon buckets. I need to be attending to them, too. The tomato plants are looking quite pathetic.

Jenni @ RainyDayGardener said...

Yes, I feel the same way about how the season is slowing coming to a finish. Perfect, loner blooms, capturing the last light of the season.

Lona said...

We have been cherishing every single bloom remaining also. This mornings frost and cold will no doubt put an end to even them I fear. Your Alstro blooms are so pretty. Volunteer blooms are always welcome.

lil red hen said...

Old-time petunia seeds will lie dormant for a long time like that. Truly amazing!! In my flower bed, mimosa seeds sprout up everytime I dig, and it's been years since the trees were there.

Diana said...

Grace, amazing that those seeds germinated after all those years, but I don't put anything past old mother nature. I am still astounded to see what these tiny seeds grow into.

I think we have a few more sunny days ahead, so we best enjoy while we can.

The Garden Ms. S said...

I just love the idea of seeing something bloom whose parents started there 15 yrs ago. :) I know there's a story in there for life somehow. :)

ricki 'sprig to twig' said...

Your Alstromeria photo is contest-worthy!

Wendy said...

That is a beautiful alstromeria - I love how it looks a great blend of the pink and the yellow.

bakingbarb said...

Wildflowers always amaze me, it seems as though they do what they want! Calliopsis was a name I wasn't familiar with but I knew the flower - I learned something new today.

Is the Alstomeris hard to grow- it's such a beauty.

You are so right, it comes down to brilliance in just a few flowers now. Sigh, beautiful but it signals something.

Betty819 said...

Now I'm curious! What did you plant in the Ammo box? Looks like some type of coleus? Also near the galvanized bucket, in front of a pink flower(hyacinth or snapdragons?)are two odd pieces of pipe..what's their purpose?

Patsi said...

The Alstro is amazing. Oh those last blooms :(

Kathleen said...

The Alstromeria photo is stunning Grace. Wish I had something left in my garden but I'm afraid it's over for another year. boo hoo.
I think the story of your seed germinating after 15 years gives us all hope. Means you can never count anything out, right?!!
I treasure every late fall bloom just like you. They have to carry us thru the winter! hope you have many more days in the garden before its over there.

CanadianGardenJoy said...

Gracie girl you have beautiful blooms still smiling at you!
Single or not they are gorgeous .. I don't think I will find anything quite like that out in my garden right now .. in fact I think it is trying to go to sleep and I keep waking it up with my mission to clean and tuck it in for real ?
I clicked on that mystery spot and saw the garden planner .. I might just try the freebie part ! Thanks girl !
Joy
PS .. did Darla tell you , I told her Phyllis publishes the pictures of Adam and Heather on her SLEAZY blog ?? she is a horrible skinny WITCH !! haha

CanadianGardenJoy said...

PPSS Gracie girl I meant to ask is that header picture of the Castor Bean variety ? I want to grow it some time myself because it is so dramatic.
What ever it is ... it is beautiful !!
Joy : )

Heather @ what's blooming this week said...

Nature truly is wonderous - to think that that little seed sat for 15 years before deciding to grow. What a joy.

Kim and Victoria said...

I love finding those little surprises in the garden. Nice pics.

VW said...

I could fill up my wheelbarrow numerous times with all the dead stuff in my yard . . . but so far it keeps sitting right where it is (the wheelbarrow and the dead stuff). Do you think it will rot away a bit and be less work in the spring? Wishful thinking . . . .

Anna said...

That wheelbarrow is doing a fine job Grace and should be given an award. Amazing how plants can come up again after such a long interval. Maybe something stirred the soil and bought the seed nearer to the surface. Like your plane theory :)

Amy said...

15 years ago...wow.I bet that was a nice surprise flower to see. Also, I like your new tabs and header! Have a good weekend. :)

Kathy said...

Every last flower of the season is a treat - a brief reminder of the wonder of summer and hope for the coming spring! Gorgeous flowers!
Hope your weekend is going well,

Kathy

Sissy said...

I love the castor bean in your header! I wish we could grow the alstromeria here, its so sweet looking. Do u get snow, Grace?

Meems said...

That's quite the story of your little yellow Calliopsis volunteer. And every single flower is appreciated as the seasons wane. Your garden is so stunning it must be difficult to leave summer behind.
Meems

MulchMaid said...

The flower joys (and you know I use that word advisedly) of fall are usually smaller and more precious than those of summer, aren't they, Grace? When they are these rare, lone blooms, it's an opportunity to appreciate our gardens differently. I am treasuring each blossom that brightens my sea of green right now.

scottweberpdx said...

Love it...especially the vagrant Coreopsis...so funny!

Barbarapc said...

Grace, I had to double check to ensure that this blog was yours when I saw that bright yellow flower! Then I saw the pink in the next frame and felt much better. At the Royal Botanical Gardens when they got rid of the carp in the waterways, and the water became clear seeds for plants sprouted that they hadn't seen in over 20 years. Maybe you've got a little ant who finally decided to move its little treasure back to the surface.